Near miss reporting ppt

08.07.2020   |   by Dataur

Toggle navigation. Help Preferences Sign up Log in. Featured Presentations. The pump operator shall be ready to shut the pump down at any moment. Always wear PPE when operating hose lines. A Definition? How grim reaper can leave his mark.

Ode to a Near Miss Cont. Those who see 'incident' here Who is reporting the Near Miss? NEAR MISS - Investigation of numerous accidents resulting in fatality or serious injury by modern-day safety professionals leads to the conclusion that their causal factors are Investigation of numerous accidents resulting in fatality or serious injury by modern-day safety professionals leads to the conclusion that their causal factors are Pelinka, M.

Undesired event Results in or has potential to: Harm people Damage property Reduce Near Miss. AIR Forum Boston. May 31, Admissions Profile. Captures applied, admitted Admissions Profile Moore Z. Michael's Hospital, 4Toronto Rehabilitation Institute An accident, incident, hazard or near miss investigation report for including the names of those involved, details of the accident, incident, hazard or near miss Aggregate data.

Nature of event reporting Data mining, fuzzy matching. Use by multiple players at the same time. Audit trail Case study, near misses. Reporting - A patient safety incident is any unintended or unexpected incident which could A patient safety incident is any unintended or unexpected incident which could Contributing Factors Horseplay Unauthorized activity, practical jokes, pranks, wrestling, etc.Sharing a near miss is second nature.

For one, reporting means taking time away from the task at hand. Two, it calls attention to everyone involved in an event that would have otherwise gone unnoticed. Many employees fear being blamedshamed, or even punished for reporting. Should we brush off close shaves? Not if reporting them makes the workplace safer—and it does. When a report is used to improve safety processes, workplace injuries and deaths decrease.

Take, for example, a missing hazard label. The missing label itself is not a near miss, but if an employee is nearly injured by the improperly labeled substance, the event would be considered a near miss. A near miss report should lead to hazard resolution and preventative measures. Regular reporting allows you to correct unsafe conditions and reduce costs associated with workplace injuries.

Reporting unsafe conditions is equally important, of course, and some companies roll hazards onto their near miss reporting form while others handle them separately.

Use them as guides to determine when to report and how to describe an event. Tip: In your report, be sure to include all conditions and circumstances that led to the slip, trip, or fall. Instead, implement measures to prevent similar events in the future. Tip: Narrow escapes often happen due to a combination of unsafe practices. Identify and address all contributing factors. Reporting near misses in this category can save a life.

Tip: As your training and re-training systems improve, your near misses in this category should decrease. An easy way to determine if an event is reportable is to ask yourself if an injury could have occurred had the chain of events not been broken by someone noticing and avoiding the hazard. You can use the app free of charge on iOS or Android devices to quickly:.

Or, you can print out a stack of near miss forms Google Doc and start making your workplace safer. If starting a system is not your call, you can email these resources to your supervisor or employer.

Do your managers blame subordinates after a close call? Do you blame or retaliate against managers? If so, you may be cutting off a potential lifeline.As members of the utility construction industry, we must spend ample time and effort working to prevent incidents and injuries from occurring through the use of proactive techniques and leading indicators.

The goals for everyone are simple: zero injuries, zero accidents, zero claims. These goals are absolutely achievable, but they may be construed as unrealistic to the common craftsman. We have heard from this demographic that accidents are not always avoidable due to any number of factors, including scheduling pressures, financing, transient workforces, vendors and deliveries. Not only that, but the construction industry has a major handicap: people. We have humans performing hazardous and often strenuous work, and the reality is that humans make mistakes.

While managers and executives strive for zero injuries, zero accidents and zero claims, they also may be doing their company a disservice. Rather than specifically pushing for zero accidents, they should be pushing for greater transparency and a culture of reporting. After all, a reporting culture typically is a safe culture. Near-Miss Events and Reporting Near-miss reporting is one way to achieve a culture of transparency.

Simply put, a near-miss is any unplanned event on a job site that did not result in an injury or loss but had the potential to do so. Near-miss events happen nearly every day, and employees should feel empowered to report them to management.

When a near-miss event occurs, it should be treated the same as a recordable injury or property damage, meaning that it deserves a thorough investigation to identify the primary causal factors, no matter how minor. As a result of thorough near-miss event investigations, organizations can develop effective corrective actions through the implementation of new policies and procedures to prevent similar events from happening again.

There are two primary benefits of near-miss reporting: cultural changes and decreased claims. Not only does the reporting offer a built-in method for responding to near-miss events, it helps to create a mindset that primes workers to watch for potentially hazardous situations. That is because a reporting culture encourages behavioral changes. For a reporting culture to be successful, workers have to feel comfortable admitting near-misses.

They have to know they are not going to be punished if they come forward with a report. The decision to move to a reporting culture should not be made by one supervisor or department. Effective and Ineffective Approaches There is more to establishing a reporting culture than simply pointing out near-miss events. We have seen companies identify a near-miss situation, call a safety stand-down and tell everyone not to do what happened ever again.

That approach is not effective. More importantly, it does not address the root cause or other causal factors of the event. The goal is to use these free lessons to improve your program. Some companies claim to have a safe work culture because they give employees stop-work authority, meaning that any employee can call a temporary halt to tasks to address a safety concern.Many companies expect employees to report near misses, but few actually spend time training their employees how to do so.

When is the last time you reviewed your near miss reporting procedures with your employees? Not all employees -- or employers -- agree on what counts as a near miss. Beyond defining what counts as a near miss, it's helpful to provide examples of near misses that might be encountered in your workplace. Here are some common examples of near misses:. By clearly defining what a near miss looks like, your employees will be able to recognize and report them when they happen.

So now your employees know what to report EHS leaders who want workers to buy into their near miss reporting program need to give them a reason to do so. We know that there's a strong link between employee ownership and safety culture. Employees who feel a substantial sense of responsibility for safety performance are more likely to report close calls and good catches -- even when "nobody is watching".

Do your employees view near miss reporting as "just another form the boss wants us to fill out"? Or do they recognize that their efforts make work safer? It would be nice if all you had to do was create a near miss form, upload it to the computer, and tell your employees about it on their first day of work. But that's not how it works at all. If you want employees to report near misses, you'll need to spend time teaching them how to report a near miss and practicing the procedures regularly.

Some topics to cover:. In order to get useful near miss reporting data, employees need to know exactly what you're looking for. One of the easiest ways to accomplish this is by walking employees through filling out an actual form and demonstrating the level of detail that is needed. A well-designed form can also go a long way toward helping employees report the right data consistently.

Here are a few guidelines to follow when creating your forms:. The near miss reporting process doesn't stop when employees hit "submit", and neither should your near miss training. Employees also need to know what happens after they file a report. Specifically, employees want to know that someone in charge is going to see and react to their report. Simply reinforcing that you read and respond to each near miss report can go a long way toward fostering a culture of safety.

Better yet, share the data and show employees that their efforts make work safer for everyone. Another topic to cover is your non-retaliation policy. In order to increase near miss reportingemployees must know that they can report incidents anonymously and without fear of retribution.

Expecting employees to report near misses isn't enough, you have to teach them. Founded inPerillon provides comprehensive cloud-based EHS Compliance and Risk Management software, efficiently connecting hundreds of employees across all levels of a global enterprise. Our flexible and simplified solutions enable organizational transparency, increased awareness, and proactive prevention of unwanted events.

near miss reporting ppt

Some topics to cover: where the form is located how to log in to your system if you're using near miss reporting software how to complete and submit the form "What information should I report?This page requires that javascript be enabled for some elements to function correctly. OSHA strongly encourages employers to investigate all incidents in which a worker was hurt, as well as close calls sometimes called "near misses"in which a worker might have been hurt if the circumstances had been slightly different.

near miss reporting ppt

In the past, the term "accident" was often used when referring to an unplanned, unwanted event. To many, "accident" suggests an event that was random, and could not have been prevented. Since nearly all worksite fatalities, injuries, and illnesses are preventable, OSHA suggests using the term "incident" investigation. Investigating a worksite incident- a fatality, injury, illness, or close call- provides employers and workers the opportunity to identify hazards in their operations and shortcomings in their safety and health programs.

Most importantly, it enables employers and workers to identify and implement the corrective actions necessary to prevent future incidents. Incident investigations that focus on identifying and correcting root causes, not on finding fault or blame, also improve workplace morale and increase productivity, by demonstrating an employer's commitment to a safe and healthful workplace.

Incident investigations are often conducted by a supervisor, but to be most effective, these investigations should include managers and employees working together, since each bring different knowledge, understanding and perspectives to the investigation. In conducting an incident investigation, the team must look beyond the immediate causes of an incident. It is far too easy, and often misleading, to conclude that carelessness or failure to follow a procedure alone was the cause of an incident.

To do so fails to discover the underlying or root causes of the incident, and therefore fails to identify the systemic changes and measures needed to prevent future incidents. When a shortcoming is identified, it is important to ask why it existed and why it was not previously addressed. These examples illustrate that it is essential to discover and correct all the factors contributing to an incident, which nearly always involve equipment, procedural, training, and other safety and health program deficiencie.

Addressing underlying or root causes is necessary to truly understand why an incident occurred, to develop truly effective corrective actions, and to minimize or eliminate serious consequences from similar future incidents.

To assist employers and workers in conducting effective incident investigations, and to develop corrective action plans, the following resources can help:. The Department of Labor does not endorse, takes no responsibility for, and exercises no control over the linked organization or its views, or contents, nor does it vouch for the accuracy or accessibility of the information contained on the destination server.

The Department of Labor also cannot authorize the use of copyrighted materials contained in linked Web sites. Users must request such authorization from the sponsor of the linked Web site. Thank you for visiting our site. Please click the button below to continue. Overview OSHA strongly encourages employers to investigate all incidents in which a worker was hurt, as well as close calls sometimes called "near misses"in which a worker might have been hurt if the circumstances had been slightly different.

Investigating a Worksite Incident Investigating a worksite incident- a fatality, injury, illness, or close call- provides employers and workers the opportunity to identify hazards in their operations and shortcomings in their safety and health programs. For example: If a procedure or safety rule was not followed, why was the procedure or rule not followed? Did production pressures play a role, and, if so, why were production pressures permitted to jeopardize safety?

Was the procedure out-of-date or safety training inadequate?

What is near miss? Why it is an Important to report immediately?

If so, why had the problem not been previously identified, or, if it had been identified, why had it not been addressed? Additional Resources To assist employers and workers in conducting effective incident investigations, and to develop corrective action plans, the following resources can help: OSHA Fact Sheet.

This guidance document provides employers with a systems approach to identifying and controlling the underlying or root causes of all incidents in order to prevent their recurrence. National Safety Council.

near miss reporting ppt

How to conduct an incident investigation PDF. Accident Investigation Basics. This PowerPoint-based online training module provides an overview on conducting root-cause workplace incident investigations.After you enable Flash, refresh this page and the presentation should play. Get the plugin now. Toggle navigation.

The Benefits of Near-Miss Reporting

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View by Category Toggle navigation. Products Sold on our sister site CrystalGraphics. Description: Always wear PPE when operating hose lines. The pump operator shall be ready to shut the pump down at any moment. Tags: miss near report safety ready to wear. Latest Highest Rated. The sole purpose of this Near Miss Safety Report is to pass information on to all personnel to insure safety. Line was charged and the air was bleed out.

Pressure was raised to psi. The Captain and Firefighter were checking the couplings. The Engineer was at the rear of the engine watching the evolution. The entire crew then heard what sounded like a hose failure. The Engineer shut the rig down. The crew then observed the severity of the damage.Department of Labor.

It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U. That someone is YOU! What Is An Accident? An unexpected and undesirable event, especially one resulting in damage or harm: car accidents on icy roads. An unforeseen incident: A series of happy accidents led to his promotion.

An instance of involuntary urination or defecation in one's clothing. Lack of intention; chance: ran into an old friend by accident. Logic A circumstance or attribute that is not essential to the nature of something.

Vehicle Accidents 2. Contact With Objects and Equipment Falls 4. Vehicle Accidents 40 2. Contact With Objects and Equipment 13 3. Falls 19 4. Human Behavior.

Protect the next shift

What would you do as a worker if you had to take minutes to don the correct P. Technology encourages short attention spans TV remote, Computer Mouse 2.

Lean staffing and increased workloads require quick attention shifts between tasks 4. Work repetition can lull workers into a loss of attention 6. Some Thought Questions: 1. Do you want to work safely? Do you want others to work safely? How often do you think about safety as you work? How often do you look for actions that could cause or prevent injuries? Action 2 2 How effective can a Committee be? Injury 2. Illness 3. Equipment or property damage.

A near miss is an event that, strictly by chance, does not result in actual or observable injury, illness, death, or property damage. What can we do to reduce the risk? Does the benefit outweigh the risk?

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